Car Is Completely Dead But The Battery Is Good (7 Possible Causes)


Have you ever tried to start your car and it just wouldn’t turn over no matter how many times you hit the gas? You probably thought your battery was dead but it turns out the battery is good. There are a few other things that could be causing your car not to start, even though the battery is good.

In this blog post, we will discuss seven possible causes of a car being completely dead even though the battery is good.

If your car is completely dead but the battery is good, the issue could be a blown fuse, loose battery terminal, faulty wiring, bad alternator, faulty starter, faulty ignition switch, and corroded wiring.

Car Is Completely Dead But The Battery Is Good (7 Possible Causes)

Car Is Completely Dead But The Battery Is Good (7 Possible Causes)

If you try to start your vehicle but nothing happens, the first thing you think of is a dead battery. However, if you check the battery and it is good, what else can cause a car to be completely dead? Here are 7 possible causes why a car might be completely dead, even if the battery is good:

1. Blown fuse

Car Is Completely Dead But The Battery Is Good (7 Possible Causes)

In a vehicle, the purpose of a fuse is to protect the wiring. When an electrical current passes through a wire, it creates heat. If too much current passes through the wire, it can overheat and start a fire. A fuse is placed in the circuit between the power source and the load. If the current passing through the fuse becomes too high, the fuse will “blow,” meaning that it will open up and break the circuit.

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This prevents too much current from reaching the load and causing damage. Fuses are rated according to how much current they can safely handle. For example, a common type of fuse used in vehicles is a 30-amp fuse. This means that it can safely handle up to 30 amps of current before it will need to be replaced.

If your car is completely dead and the battery is good, one possible reason is a blown fuse. The fuse is responsible for providing power to the car’s electrical components, and if it blows, the electrical system will no longer work. The main fuse that would need to be checked is the one for the ignition. This fuse supplies power to the ignition system, and if it is blown, the engine will not start. Other fuses that could prevent the engine from starting include the fuel pump fuse and the ECU fuse.

There are a few different things that can cause a fuse to blow, including a loose wire or a short circuit. If you suspect that your car’s fuse has blown, the first thing you should do is check the fuse box for any signs of damage. If you see any burned out fuses, replace them with new ones.

2. Loose battery terminal

In order for a car’s battery to function properly, it must be connected to the car’s electrical system via a positive and negative terminal. The positive terminal is typically marked with a plus sign, while the negative terminal is typically marked with a minus sign. The purpose of the battery terminals is to provide a conductive pathway between the battery and the electrical system.

The positive terminal is connected to the car’s voltage regulator, while the negative terminal is connected to the car’s engine block. In order for the electrical system to work properly, it is essential that the battery terminals are clean and free of corrosion.

A common reason why a car is completely dead but the battery is good is a loose battery terminal. The battery terminals need to be tight in order to create a good connection. If the connection is loose, it can cause all sorts of electrical problems. In some cases, you might be able to tighten the terminal yourself.

Over time, battery terminals can become corroded by exposure to moisture and chemicals. If this happens, it can impede the flow of electricity and cause starting problems.

3. Faulty wiring

When you turn the key in the ignition, you expect your car to start. But if the engine doesn’t turn over, it could be due to a problem with the wiring. Faulty wiring can cause all sorts of problems, from preventing the engine from starting to causing the headlights to flicker.

There are many reasons why a car might not start even though the battery is good. One possibility is that there is a problem with the wiring. Wiring problems can prevent the electrical system from functioning properly, and this can lead to all sorts of problems, including not be able to start the vehicle.

4. Bad alternator

Car Is Completely Dead But The Battery Is Good (7 Possible Causes)

A car’s alternator is responsible for charging the battery and powering the electrical system while the engine is running. If the alternator fails, the battery will eventually run out of power, leaving the car dead. The battery can be in working condition, but it is simply not being charged enough.

There are a number of reasons why an alternator can fail, but one of the most common is simply age. As alternators get older, their components can become worn out, making them less effective at doing their job.

In some cases, an old alternator can be repaired, but in others, it will need to be replaced. Regardless of the cause, a dead car is a major inconvenience, so it’s important to be aware of the signs of a failing alternator. If the lights on your dash start flickering or dimming, it’s a good indication that your alternator is on its way out.

5. Faulty starter

Car Is Completely Dead But The Battery Is Good (7 Possible Causes)

Starting a car is simple, right? Just turn the key and the engine roars to life. But have you ever thought about what’s actually happening when you turn that key? In order to understand how a car starter works, it’s helpful to have a basic understanding of how an engine works.

An engine relies on a series of small explosions to generate power. The explosion is caused by a mixture of gasoline and air igniting in the cylinders. In order for those explosions to happen, the cylinders need to be filled with the gasoline-air mixture and then ignited. That’s where the car starter comes in.

When you turn the key, the starter motor is activated. The starter motor has a small gear that meshes with a larger gear on the engine. The spinning of the starter motor turns the gears, which in turn spins the crankshaft. The crankshaft is connected to the pistons in the cylinders.

As it spins, it also draws in air and fuel into the cylinders. Once all of the cylinders are filled with the gasoline-air mixture, the ignition system sparks and causes an explosion in each cylinder. That explosion drives the pistons down, which turns the crank shaft and powers your car.

When a car won’t start, it’s often because the battery is dead. But if the battery is fine and the engine still won’t turn over, the problem may be with the starter. The starter is responsible for getting the engine running, and if it’s not working properly, the car won’t start.

6. Faulty ignition switch

The ignition switch in a car is responsible for supplying power to the engine starter motor. When the key is turned, the starter motor engages the engine flywheel, which in turn starts the engine. The ignition switch is also responsible for supplying power to the car’s accessories, such as the headlights, radio, and windshield wipers.

In most cars, the ignition switch is located on the steering column, just below the steering wheel. Some cars may have an ignition switch that is located on the dash near the steering column.

When the ignition switch fails, it can prevent the engine from starting even though the battery is good. In many cases, a faulty ignition switch is the result of wear and tear, but it can also be caused by an electrical short or a manufacturing defect.

Replacing a faulty ignition switch is usually a fairly simple process, but it is important to have the work done by a qualified mechanic.

7. Corroded wiring

Car Is Completely Dead But The Battery Is Good (7 Possible Causes)

When a car won’t start, it can be frustrating and even frightening. There are many potential causes, but one of the most common is simply corroded wiring. Over time, the metal in electrical wires can break down, causing them to lose conductivity.

This can prevent the flow of electricity needed to power the engine. In some cases, the damage may be localized, making it possible to repair the affected wires. However, if the corrosion is extensive, it may be necessary to replace the entire wiring system.

Another corroded wiring can be actually corossion on the battery terminals. Battery terminals can corrode for a variety of reasons. One common cause is exposure to the elements and this will prevent your car from starting.

Over time, battery terminals can become coated with a layer of dirt and grime, which can eventually lead to corrosion. Another reason battery terminals may corrode is due to a buildup of sulfate crystals. These crystals form when the battery is not properly charged, and they can attach themselves to the terminals, causing corrosion.

There are a few ways to prevent corrosion on battery terminals. First, it is important to keep the batteries clean. Any dirt or grime on the terminals can act as a conductor, causing the corrosion to happen more quickly. Second, it is helpful to use a terminal protector. This is a product that creates a barrier between the metal and the corrosive materials. Third, it is advisable to check the battery terminals regularly and clean off any corrosion that has already formed.

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Hi there. I am a certified Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) mechanic since 2018 and a car detailer for 10 years.

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