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How To Clean a Turbo Without Removing It


The turbo is designed to give power to your engine and to boost the acceleration. The turbo is driven by exhaust gases. It is located with one side connected to the exhaust manifold and the other side to the mass airflow sensor.

Because the turbo is powered by exhaust gases, over time, it can get clogged up by a carbon deposit. A clogged turbo will result in a lack of power. If left unchecked, this can lead to premature wear. You should clean your turbo when you notice the lack of power or every 30,000 miles. Here is how to clean a turbo without removing it:

How To Clean a Turbo Without Removing It

The turbo gives power to your engine and makes driving and accelerating more exciting. But, it can also get dirty from the carbon buildup and fail. In the worst-case scenario, your engine can stop. Some of the early signs of clogging aren’t very consequential, but they’re easy to recognize. Left unchecked, these can become worse over time and cause catastrophic damage. There is a way on how to clean a turbo without removing it. Here is how to clean a turbo without removing it:

1. Park your car outside

Your vehicle will be running while you are cleaning your turbo, so you need a place with great ventilation. Park your vehicle outside, preferably in shade, if it’s too hot outside. Whatever works for you, just get comfortable.

2. Get a turbo cleaner and gloves

How To Clean a Turbo Without Removing It

You will need a turbo cleaner in order to clean your turbo. The one that I use costs around $12. I got mine from amazon.com, you can order it here. If you have some leftover turbo cleaner, that is fine. But, I recommend that you use the whole bottle for one cleaning. Also, the engine will be at a working temperature, so it’s best if you have gloves and don’t get burned.

3. Warm up your engine

Start your vehicle and run it until it reaches the proper operating temperature. Your vehicle will need to be working throughout the whole cleaning process. So, if you are not comfortable working around a hot engine, put on some long sleeves and gloves.

4. Disconnect the air inlet pipe

How To Clean a Turbo Without Removing It

Locate your mass airflow sensor and disconnect the air inlet pipe that goes after the mass airflow sensor. The location of the MAF will be different for different vehicles. The turbo is powered by exhaust gases. So, one side of the turbo is connected to the exhaust manifold and the other one is connecter to the air intake. Make sure to disconnect the air inlet after the MAF sensor and not before the MAF sensor.

5. Spray the whole turbo cleaner

How To Clean a Turbo Without Removing It

Spray the whole can of turbo cleaner in the air inlet with short sprays. Do not spray it in one long spray as you may overflood the engine. As you spray the turbo cleaner, you will notice that the engine revs will increase for a couple of seconds. This is because the air to fuel ratio is unbalanced. Wait for the engine to calm down before spraying again.

6. Leave the engine idling for 5 minutes

How To Clean a Turbo Without Removing It

After you spray the whole can of turbo cleaner, leave the engine running with the air inlet disconnected. Do not rev the engine at this point, just let it idle. You should notice a change in the exhaust gases coming out from the tailpipe. This is why I said you should do this in a place with great ventilation.

7. Rev up the engine

How To Clean a Turbo Without Removing It

Rev up the engine to 3000 RPMs 8-10 times. Do not exceed the 3000 RPMs. As soon as you reach 3000 RPMs let go of the gas pedal and then rev again. Again, you should notice a different smoke from the tailpipe.

8. Reconnect the air inlet pipe

Reconnect the air inlet pipe as it was before and take your vehicle for a 20 minute ride. Before you drive the car, make sure that there is no air leaking from the inlet. If your screws are rusty, replace them with new ones.

Most Common Signs Of a Clogged or Failing Turbo

A failing or clogged turbo usually is associated to a lack of power. But, there are some more signs and symptoms that a clogged or failing turbo can give you. Here are the most common signs of a clogged or failing turbo:

1. Lack of power

If you know your car, or if you have experienced driving turbocharged cars, this one can be difficult to overlook. The engine doesn’t produce the power output as it should. It’s just not as perky as it used to be. You can also feel a kind of lack of momentary engine response when you want to accelerate

Sometimes the engine won’t even get to a higher revs level and the turbo lag seems to be much longer than usual. Now, this all may refer to an under boost condition where the turbo suffers from some severe failure, it is clogged, or where the system can’t deliver the boost to the engine.

2. Blue/white smoke

A healthy engine should never emit any visible smoke from the exhaust system. There are many factors that can cause an engine to emit smoke, but a clogged or a failing turbo is one of them. Bluish white smoke is a sign the engine is burning oil. This is a real problem because oil should never be a part of the combustion process.

High engine wear or crankcase ventilation system malfunction is usually the root of the problem here. The most common turbo related issue is leaky shaft seals.

3. White smoke

White smoke can indicate that the engines burning coolant, there’s moisture present in the intake, or you have high EGR rates. In terms of the turbo link, coolant burning symptoms may occur because of leaks in water-cooled turbo models.

4. Black smoke

Black smoke refers to incomplete combustion. This just means that the fuel that’s getting into the engine isn’t burning completely. A lot of things can cause this, but the main one is a blockage in the proper oxygen supply. A broken or clogged turbo is a real issue, especially if we can’t deliver proper air to the engine.

Broken elements like a failing compressor wheel, seizures, or impaired boost control are all issues related to black smoke. Another issue could be leaks within the ducts that deliver the charge air or an intercooler that may not be sealed or suffer from inner clogs.

5. Whining/Siren noise

Noises can be an obvious symptom of severe turbocharger failure. You can’t miss them because they amplify as the engine revs up. Sometimes, you can even hear them loudly inside the cabin. A whining or siren noise is a very distinctive turbo failure sign and indicates that there’s a failure with the turbo on the compressor side.

6. Hissing noise

Whether it’s a shaft with too much play, out of balance, bent, or chipped compressor blades, they’ll all result in a hissing noise until the turbo completely collapses. Whistling noises are common for leaks within the charged air ducts, whereas hissing noises are usually accompanied by an exhaust smell in the cabin and are related to leaks on the exhaust side of the turbo.

7. Error codes from ECU

The last possible symptom caused by turbo failures are errors registered by the engine control unit or the ECU. The illuminated check engine light on the dashboard is pretty common. You’ll register specific error codes via OBD diagnostics. In some circumstances, the malfunctioning turbo can result in the engine being put into limp mode with reduced revs and power. But, this isn’t a fixed rule and some of the most catastrophic turbo failures can happen without any of the error codes.

These error codes can typically refer to lack of proper boost pressure, turbo boost control device failures, or erratic readings from the MAF. If some of these symptoms are present, it could be that the turbo is broken. A thorough system check has to be performed to confirm it before replacing the part.

How To Clean an EGR Valve Without Removing It


The EGR valves (exhaust gas recirculation) are designed to stop nitrogen oxide pollution. They have to work right or your check engine light will come on and you can fail an emissions test. Sometimes, the EGR valves can break and stick wide open. Then, it’ll suck so much air that the engine will idle poorly and run bad because there would be more air than fuel mixture in the combustion chamber.

The hot exhaust gas comes out of the engine and some of it goes into the EGR valve. When the EGR valve opens up, it sends a hot exhaust gas back into the intake manifold, so that sends already burned gas into the engine. So, the engine temperature is lower and when it combusts, it won’t create nitrogen oxides and pollute the atmosphere.

Over time, the carbon builds up and will clog the EGR valve. If you are a skilled mechanic, you won’t have a hard time removing and cleaning your EGR valve. But, if you are not a mechanic, here is how to clean an EGR valve without removing it:

How To Clean an EGR Valve Without Removing It

How To Clean an EGR Valve Without Removing It

Over time, the EGR valve gets dirty. The carbon builds on the walls of the EGR valve and it can cause premature wear. You should clean your EGR valve every 20,000 miles. The good thing is that you don’t have to remove your EGR valve in order to clean it. Here is how to clean an EGR valve without removing it:

1. Gather the needed cleaning supplies

Gather the needed cleaning supplies

In order to clean your EGR valve, you will need to have a clean microfiber towel, an EGR valve cleaner, and latex gloves. The EGR valve cleaner is a corrosive product, so it’s best if you wear gloves while cleaning the EGR valve. I personally use the LIQUI MOLY EGR valve cleaner (check the price on amazon.com).

2. Locate the EGR Valve

Locate the EGR Valve

Different vehicles will have their EGR valve in different places. The EGR valve is attached to the intake manifold. Usually, the EGR valve is located where on the backside of the engine. If you do not have direct access to the EGR valve without removing a lot of parts, you can find the nearest access to the EGR valve. On some vehicles, the closes access point to the EGR valve is through the turbo.

3. Gain access to the EGR Valve

How To Clean an EGR Valve Without Removing It

Gain access to the EGR valve by removing the cover. Be very careful not to lose any screw or clamp. Your EGR valve might not look like the one shown in the photo, but I am sure that it won’t be crystal clear.

4. Start the vehicle and rev it to 2000 RPMs

Start the vehicle and rev it to 2000 RPMs

Start your vehicle and wait for it to reach the normal operating temperature. You will need someone to sit in the car and keep the RPMs in 2000. The sound of the engine will change because as you spray the EGR valve cleaner, the air to fuel mixture ratio will be different.

5. Spray half of the cleaning solution (250ml)

The EGR valve solution that I use comes in a 500ml can. Ideally, I use half of the can only. Make sure to spray little by little. You don’t want to overwhelm the engine. Short 1 second sprays will do the job just fine. Wipe the EGR valve and surrounding area with a microfiber towel.

6. Reinstall the EGR valve cover

Turn off the car and wait for the engine to cool down and then reinstall the EGR valve cover and any other parts that you had to remove to get to the EGR valve itself.

7. Scan the vehicle for error codes

At this point, the check engine light should turn itself off once the computer gets the information that the EGR valve has been cleaned. You can run a diagnostics to double-check and see if there will be any other error codes associated with the EGR valve. This is the OBD2 scanning tool that I use (check price on amazon.com).

Most Common Signs That Your EGR Valve Needs Cleaning

There are 2 most common signs that your EGR valve needs cleaning. These signs are perfect for people that don’t have scanning tools. If you do have a scanning tool, you can go ahead and run diagnostics. The scanning tool will show any EGR related error codes if the valve needs cleaning or replacing. Here are the most common signs that your EGR valve needs cleaning:

1. Rough Idle

The function of the EGR valve is to reduce emission gases exhausted from the vehicle. The emission gas is recirculated back to the engine through the intake manifold to be re-burned in the combustion chamber. Normally, when the EGR valve is clogged, rough idle will occur. The EGR valve can get stuck open and there can be increased fuel consumption and smoke smell while driving. If this happens, you will fail an emission test. Moreover, the check engine light will illuminate and trigger EGR error codes.

2. EGR Valve Stuck Closed

Usually, this is caused by a blockage and buildup of carbons. If the EGR valve is clogged, there is also a good chance the intake manifold is full of carbon as well. Some of the symptoms of a stuck closed EGR valve are pinging noise, tapping noise, and detonation noise, and a check engine light. You can try and clean the EGR valve with a cleaning solution. If this doesn’t solve your problem, you should replace the EGR valve.

What Is The Best EGR Valve Cleaner

Liqui Moly is a German company that produces a lot of car cleaning products. One of them is the EGR valve cleaning product. I personally have used this product for cleaning my EGR valve without removing it. The canister is 500ml and you can use it to clean your EGR valve twice. The Liqui Moly EGR valve cleaning product will not damage any seals on the engine. It cleans nicely and is very easy to use. After you used half of the cleaning product, store it for your next EGR valve cleaning.

How To Clean a Throttle Body Without Removing It


A throttle body is located between your air intake filter and piping and your intake manifold. The throttle body acts as a valve, restricting the amount of air that can go into the engine. As you press the gas pedal, you are actually opening up the throttle plate and allowing for more air to pass into the intake manifold, and then into the engine.

Over time, the throttle body will get dirty and you will feel a lack of power. Cleaning the throttle body is an easy task and I personally think that everyone can do it. The great part is that you don’t have to remove the throttle body in order to clean it.

How To Clean a Throttle Body Without Removing It

Cleaning a throttle body is very simple and I think that everyone can do it. The best and the only way that you should clean a throttle body is without removing it. The throttle body should be cleaner every 30,000 miles. Here is how to clean a throttle body without removing it.

1. Get a clean towel and a throttle body cleaning product

Get a clean towel and a throttle body cleaning product

Before you start cleaning your throttle body, you should get a clean towel and a throttle cleaning product. Some vehicles have a big warning sign on the throttle body about which cleaning products you can use. Usually, Ford vehicles have specific throttle body cleaning products. If you don’t see a warning there, you can use the product that I use (check the price on amazon.com).

2. Get access to the throttle body

How To Clean a Throttle Body Without Removing It

To access the throttle body, you will have to remove the engine air intake rubber. The air intake rubber is usually secured with a clamp which is easy to remove. The rubber makes it so easy to locate the throttle body if you are not sure what you are looking for. Remove the screws and secure the air intake rubber.

3. Move the throttle plate to an open position

Move the throttle plate to an open position

To clean the inside of the throttle body, you will have to place the throttle place in an open position. Please, do not move the throttle plate with your hands. Have someone in the vehicle to push the gas pedal. If you move your throttle plate with your hands, you can confuse the computer and then you will have to do a reset.

4. Spray the throttle body cleaning product

Once the throttle body plate is in an open position, spray the throttle body cleaner in the throttle body. Do not spray a lot because you can overflood the engine. Spray 3-4 times on the plate itself and on the inside of the throttle body.

5. Clean the throttle body with a clean towel

Get a clean towel and clean the inside of the body. I recommend that you use a clean towel because you are trying to remove the buildup debris and not add new. Make sure to clean the plate as well as the inside of the throttle body.

6. Reinstall the engine air intake rubber

Reinstall the engine air intake rubber and tight the screws on the clamp. Move the air intake rubber to make sure that it is secured properly. You don’t want to have a leaking air.

7. Start your vehicle

Start your vehicle as you would normally do. If the vehicle is not starting, press the gas pedal to the floor and try to start it. If you sprayed a little bit more of the cleaning product, your vehicle might not start. But, no worries. Continue to crank the engine and it will start.

What Are The Most Common Signs Of a Clogged or Bad Throttle Body

When the throttle body is clogged or has failed, there are some signs and symptoms that can help you find out what’s wrong with your vehicle. Here are the most common signs of a clogged or bad throttle body.

1. Reduced power or Limp mode

If you notice that your vehicle is slower than usual, this is a sign that the throttle body is either clogged and needs cleaning, or it has failed. Limp mode or reduced power is a safety feature designed to limit engine performance in order to prevent engine damage. The computer sets the vehicle into limp mode when a fault is detected.

Scan your vehicle with an OBD scanner (check prices on amazon.com) and check the fuel section. The fuel section should read “CL” or closed-loop after the engine is warm. If it reads “OL” or open-loop, then the vehicle is stuck in limp mode. At this point, you should try and clean your throttle body and then run diagnostics again. If you are getting the same error, then you need to replace the throttle body.

2. Poor idle and engine performance issues

The throttle body is responsible for allowing a certain amount of air flowing into the engine. When the throttle body is clogged or has failed, it can cause poor idle and stalling at the stop light, as well as engine performance issues while driving. Try cleaning the throttle body with a throttle body cleaning product. If you still have issues, replace the throttle body.

3. Lack of power

When a vehicle has a clogged or faulty throttle body, the vehicle will have a lack of power while driving. Some vehicles are even limited to second gear and can go no faster than 35 miles per hour.

Use a scan tool (check prices on amazon.com) and check for throttle body related codes. If you see any error codes associated with a throttle body, try cleaning the throttle body. If the problems and error codes are still there, replace the throttle body.

Can a Throttle Body Cleaner Damage The Engine

The throttle body cleaner will not damage your engine. The throttle body cleaner is designed to remove gum, varnish, and other contaminants that get stuck on the throttle body. You can, however, overflood the engine if you spray too much of the throttle body cleaner into the throttle body. But, this will do no permanent damage to the engine.

How To Clean Your Fuel Injectors Without Removing Them?


As vehicles age, a lot of times carbon builds up in both the engine and the fuel injectors and makes you burn a lot more gas and get worse gas mileage. The fuel injectors can get clogged up and you end up using more gas than you need to.

How To Clean Your Fuel Injectors Without Removing Them?

Cleaning your fuel injectors is something that you should do every 30,000 miles. You have to be a skilled mechanic to be able to remove your fuel injectors, clean them, and then re-install them. What if I show you how to clean your fuel injectors without removing them?

For cleaning my fuel injectors without removing them I use a fuel injector cleaning tool that I got from amazon.com. Follow the steps and at the end, you will have clean fuel injectors which will significantly increase your vehicle’s fuel economy.

How To Clean Your Fuel Injectors Without Removing Them

1. Locate the fuel rail on the fuel injector

Locate the fuel rail on the fuel injector

The fuel rail is one of the most important components of the fuel injector. It has a function to supply the fuel injectors with fuel. The location of the fuel injectors and fuel rail will vary from vehicle to vehicle. It’s best if you read your manufacturer’s manual to successfully locate your fuel rail.

2. Disconnect the fuel rail

Disconnect the fuel rail

Once you locate the fuel rail on the fuel injectors, go ahead and disconnect it. You should have an exposed hose on which you will connect the fuel injector cleaning tool later on.

3. Fill the fuel injector cleaning tool with a cleaning solution

Remove the cap of the fuel injector cleaning tool and add the cleaning solution. I personally use a fuel cleaning product made by Lucas (check prices on amazon.com). Make sure to fill the cleaning tool all the way to the top.

4. Attach the cleaning tool to the hood

hang the cleaning tool on the hood

The cleaning tool has to be above the engine. Ideally, you should hang the cleaning tool on the hood. There is a hook on the cleaning tool which allows you to do so.

5. Connect the outlet pipe to the fuel rail

Connect the outlet pipe to the fuel rail

After you hang the cleaning tool, you need to attach the outlet pipe of the cleaning tool to the exposed fuel rail. The cleaning tool comes with a lot of connectors. Install the connector that fits your fuel rail and attach the cleaning tool.

6. Remove the fuel pump relay from the fuse box

Go to the fuse box and take out the fuel pump relay to turn the fuel pump off so it cannot supply the fuel to the engine. There are many relays and they all look the same. So, it’s best if you read the manufacturer’s manual to see which relay is for the fuel pump.

7. Connect the air compressor to the cleaning tool

Connect the air compressor to the cleaning tool

Connect the air compressor to the air inlet connector of the cleaning tool and set the PSI anywhere between 40 and 50. You need air to push the cleaning fluid into the fuel rail. If you don’t have an air compressor, you can grab one on amazon.com.

8. Start your vehicle

Start your vehicle and keep it running until there is no more cleaning fluid into the cleaning tool. When the cleaning tool runs out of cleaning fluid, you need to turn your vehicle off and disconnect the cleaning tool.

9. Reconnect your fuel pump relay and fuel rail hose

Re-install the fuel pump relay in the fuse box and reconnect the fuel rail hose. Make sure that your engine is cold so you won’t get burned. At this point, you should have a clean fuel injectors.

What Are The Most Common Signs Of Bad Fuel Injectors

There are 6 common signs that a bad or failing fuel injectors will give before it fails. These signs and symptoms can be caught even by an untrained mechanic.

1. Engine shaking

A clogged fuel injector will create an unbalanced situation resulting in a shaky or rough idle. An engine shaking is a sign of a misfire. You can use a scan tool and determine which cylinder is misfiring. Usually, a P0301, P0302, P0303, and P0304 error codes are associated with cylinder misfiring. You can use a graphing tool to test each fuel injector.

2. Lack of power

When a cylinder is not firing properly, there will be a lack of power at takeoff and high speed. Dirty fuel injectors will restrict the amount of fuel going to the cylinders causing a lean condition. A lean condition can result in a lack of power. This is very hard on the engine causing premature wear.

3. White smoke coming out of tailpipe

Usually, when white smoke starts coming out of your tailpipe, this means the fuel injector is stuck open and is spraying more gas than it should. This action will result in poor gas mileage and will trigger a rich code.

4. Hard starting

Your vehicle will have a hard time starting if one or more fuel injectors are completely clogged up. Cleaning them might not be a solution at this point.

5. Vehicle not starting at all

When one or more fuel injectors are stuck open, the excess fuel can foul out the spark plug. The spark plugs can get wet from the fuel and it won’t be able to create a spark to ignite the combustion.

6. Bad catalytic converter or oxygen sensor

Usually, when excess fuel is dumped into the exhaust system for a long period of time, this can damage the oxygen sensor and catalytic converter.

Do fuel injectors need to be cleaned?

Fuel injectors need to be cleaned every 30,000 miles or less, depending on the condition of the vehicle. If your vehicle is starting to show signs of clogged fuel injectors, you should clean them more often. The most common sign of a failing fuel injector is an engine shaking.

Can you just replace one fuel injector?

Technically, you can replace just one fuel injector. But, it’s always a good idea to change them all as a set. This is because if you have old fuel injectors and new fuel injectors, the engine will run unevenly.

Why Is My Fuel Tank Not Filling Up and How To Fix It


Are you having trouble with filling your fuel tank? Is your fuel pump shutting off preventing you from filling your fuel tank? Here is why your fuel tank is not filling up and how to fix it.

”The most common reason why your fuel tank is not filling up is because you have a clogged or a faulty evaporative emissions control system (EVAP). The EVAP is designed to collect and store the fuel vapors from the fuel tank and move them to the intake manifold for combustion. If your EVAP is clogged or faulty, you won’t be able to fill your gas tank.”

Why Is My Fuel Tank Not Filling Up?

Why Is My Fuel Tank Not Filling Up and How To Fix It

When you put gas into the car, it displaces the air that’s in the tank and the air has to come out somewhere. Now, in the old days, the air would just come right back out of where the filler was and it would pollute the atmosphere. But, all modern-day cars use a system that’s called an EVAP. It is designed to keep the vapors from polluting the atmosphere by keeping them inside the car.

Evaporative emissions control or EVAP systems have been installed in motor vehicles since 1970. Their purpose is to collect and store fuel vapors from the fuel tank and at the correct time move them to the intake manifold for combustion.

EVAP systems have changed over the years from simple float bowl and fuel tank vacuum-operated types to fully sealed OBD, to monitored and ECM controlled systems.

If your evaporative emissions control system is clogged or faulty, it will keep shutting off your fuel pump and you won’t be able to fill your tank with fuel. A problem to this solution can be as easy as cleaning some of the hoses, or it could be as serious as replacing some of the EVAP components.

How Do I Fix My Gas Tank Not Filling?

If your EVAP system is faulty or clogged, you won’t be able to fill your fuel tank. The fuel pump will just constantly shut off preventing you from filling your fuel tank, or just filling it little by little. Here is how to fix a fuel tank that is not filling properly.

1. Run a vehicle diagnostics with a scan tool

Run a vehicle diagnostics with a scan tool

If your fuel tank is not filling up, it is probably the EVAP system. Just to be sure, you can run diagnostics on your vehicle with a scan tool. The P0440 error code is associated with a EVAP malfunction. If you don’t have a scan tool, you can go ahead and proceed with the following steps.

2. Clean the area around the fuel tank cap

Clean the area around the fuel tank cap

The EVAP system can get dirty and clogged from constantly working. Personally, I didn’t care about the area around my fuel tank cap. It was always dirty until one day I got my EVAP system clogged from all the dirt. It is easy for the dirt to get inside the fuel tank. Make sure to clean your fuel tank cap area every time you wash your vehicle.

3. Locate the Evaporative emissions control canister

On almost all vehicles, the EVAP canister is located in the engine bay. If your vehicle is lifted on jack stands, you can just follow the hoses from the fuel tank into the engine bay area. Or, you can read your manufacturer’s manual and see where your EVAP canister is located. The EVAP canister can look differently like shown in the image.

4. Clean the hose connecting to the EVAP canister

Once you locate the EVAP canister, remove the hose that is connected to the canister. You need to clean the hose and the connector on the canister with a paper towel. Wipe the hose and the connector and make sure there are no huge pieces of debris. You can also blow it with an air compressor.

5. Try filling your fuel tank with gas

Go to the gas station and fill your fuel tank. If you only had a clogged hose, you should be able to fill your gas tank. If it still not working, you might need to change the charcoal canister.

6. Get your EVAP charcoal canister replaced

EVAP charcoal canister replaced

The hose that you cleaned from the previous step is connecting to a canister that is full of charcoal. When the air is pushed through there, it vents hydrocarbons out of the air and then just vents pure air into the atmosphere. This prevents the gas fumes from polluting the atmosphere. When the EVAP charcoal canister is clogged, it has to be replaced with a new one.

Why You Shouldn’t Overfill Your Gas Tank

”You shouldn’t overfill your gas tank because once the fuel pump shuts off, pouring more gas could get in the EVAP canister and clog it up. You cannot clean the EVAP canister, only replace it.”

Modern vehicles have what is called EVAP systems. Instead of the gasoline vapor escaping to the atmosphere, it’s recycled and burned inside the engine. The EVAP canister filters out the hydrocarbons and lets pure air come out when it needs to filter it out.

These EVAP canisters work great for filtering out gasoline fumes. But, if you are filling your gas tank and the fuel pump shuts off, if you pump extra in, you can pump liquid gasoline and that will get into the EVAP canister. If liquid gasoline gets inside these EVAP canisters, it destroys them.

Replacing an EVAP canister can cost as much as $380 and another $240 for labor. So, you don’t want to waste all that money just because you put extra gas in the car. These canisters are getting smaller and smaller, so just a little bit of gasoline can ruin them.

Remember, once the fuel pump goes off, do not pour more gas in the fuel tank.

Is It Safe To Drive With a Bad Inner And Outer Tie Rod?


An inner or outer tie rod plays an important role in the suspension system. The inner and outer tie rod controls the left and right movement of your wheels. You can not pass a safety inspection with a bad inner or outer tie rod. So, is it safe to drive with a bad inner and outer tie rod?

”It is not safe to drive with a bad inner and outer tie rod because if your inner and outer tie rod are severely worn out your vehicle can start to wander on the road and you will not have control over the direction of the wheels. A bad inner and outer tie rod starts with an excessive steering wheel free play and over time you will completely lose control over steering.”

Is It Safe To Drive With a Bad Inner And Outer Tie Rod?

What Does a Tie Rod Do?

Is It Safe To Drive With a Bad Inner And Outer Tie Rod?

The suspension and steering systems are very complex systems built out of many components. Each of those components plays a key role. When we say suspension or steering, most people think about the shock absorbers or steering wheel. But, the truth is, there is more to it. One of the most important components of the suspension and steering system is the inner and outer tie rod.

”The inner and outer tie rods are components of the suspension and steering system that connects the steering rack to the steering knuckle on both front wheels. The inner and outer tie rod are the parts that are enabling your wheels to turn left and right. When an alignment is done on your vehicle, the mechanic is actually adjusting the inner and outer tie rods.”

Although it might look like a simple and not so expensive part, the inner and outer tie rod have a very important role. A bad inner and outer tie rod can be more of a safety issue than a performance issue. If your tie rod is bad, your vehicle can start to wander on the road. If your left tie rod is bad, when you turn your steering wheel, the left wheel will stay straight. You can imagine how hard it is to steer with only one obeying wheel.

There are some signs that a bad inner and outer tie rod will give. It is important to diagnose and replace your inner and outer tie rod on time before it becomes a problem.

Most Common Signs Of a Bad Inner and Outer Tie Rod

Most Common Signs Of a Bad Inner and Outer Tie Rod

The inner and outer tie rod doesn’t have a specific lifespan expectancy. Like any other part, it can prematurely fail. It all depends on how and where you drive your vehicle. However, a bad inner and outer tie rod can be a safety issue. It is important that you catch the failing signs and symptoms in the early stages. Here are the 4 most common signs of a bad inner and outer tie rod.

1. Excessive steering wheel free play

When the inner and outer tie rod starts to fail, there will be excessive free play in the steering wheel. The steering wheel will feel loose and your vehicle will shake while driving. If your inner and outer tie rod are severely worn, your vehicle might start to wander on the road. It will be very difficult to drive it in a straight line. Also, a worn tie rod will throw the alignment off and your tires will wear out quicker and unevenly. The tire that has been worn out unevenly is usually the side that has a worn tie rod. You can use this to diagnose and pinpoint the bad tie rod.

2. Abnormal noise coming from the wheels and excessive vibration

When the tie rod goes bad, there will be an excessive slack that can cause the suspension components to become slightly loose. When components like tie rod become worn, they can cause a knocking or clunking noise and you can hear them while turning the steering wheel. This is usually because of the free play in the steering wheel also caused by a bad tie rod.

3. Tie rod leaking grease

If your tie rod is leaking grease, it is a clear indication that the tie rod is worn. Apart from leaking grease, the second bad thing is that dirt will start to accumulate on the places where the tie rod is leaking grease causing a buildup. This can cause the tie rod to fail prematurely. The purpose of the grease is to allow the tie rod to move freely while reducing friction. If you have a leaking tie rod, you should have it replaced.

4. Visual inspection to determine the condition of the tie rod

It is always a great idea to perform a visual inspection to determine which tie rod is worn out. Here is how to perform the visual inspection and what to look for.

  1. Lift the front end of the vehicle and place it on jack stands.
  2. Then, go ahead and remove both front tires.
  3. Once you locate the outer tie rod, rock it from side to side to see if it’s loose. If the outer rod is loose, make sure to replace it. Now, if you are going to remove the worn out tie rod by yourself, make sure to use a tie rod puller. If you do not have a tie rod puller, use a hammer and bang on the steering knuckle where the tie rod is mounted. Do not hit the ball joint or the tie rod itself, because you can damage the rack and pinion.
  4. Then go ahead and inspect the inner tie rod.
  5. If you find it worn out, replace it. If you are replacing the tie rod by yourself, make sure to count the number of turns. Then, with the same number of turns, install the new inner tie rod.
  6. After you have replaced the inner and outer tie rod, make sure to get an alignment.

Are Tie Rod Ends Supposed To Move

The tie rod ends are not supposed to move. So, if you are suspecting that your tie rods are going bad and you are doing a visual inspection, excessive free play in tie rod ends is a clear sign that you need to replace the tie rod ends.

When To Replace Tie Rod Ends

Inner and outer tie rod does not have a specific lifespan expectancy. How long the tie rod will last depends on your vehicle model, where, and how you drive it. You should replace your tie rods only when you hear a clunking and knocking noise coming from the front wheels, or your vehicle starts to wander.