Can You Wax Your Car Too Much?

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Have you ever wondered if there is a limit of times you can wax your car without damaging the paint?

Waxing too much will eventually cause build up and clouding. If you are using a paste wax on your brand new car, it will damage the factory clearcoat. However, synthetic car wax will not hurt the paint or clearcoat, only many layers of synthetic will start to cloud over time.

How Often Should I Wax My Car

There isn’t really a guideline when it comes to how often should you wax your car. Also, there are too many variables such as the environment, do you park your car outside or in a garage, are you a chauffeur or a daily driver. Some wax manufacturers advice to wax your car every 2-4 months. So, with the help of the manufacturer’s advice + my own experience, I will have to say that you should wax your car at least 2 times per year, and this is a minimum. Ideally, you should do it 4 times a year.

Why You Should Wax Your Car

A lot of people wonder is it important to wax their cars, and the answer is yes. Wax adds shine, but more importantly, it adds paint protection against UV rays, scratches, discoloration, water spots, and mess that will stain the paint.

Also, a lot of people wonder is it important to clay and polish your car before applying wax? If you leave the contamination on the surface before applying the wax, this will lock it in.

By claying it you are pulling the contamination out of the pores of the paint giving it a super slick feeling which ensures a better bond between the paint and the wax.

Polishing isn’t exactly necessary because the polish is removing the oxidation, scratches, and swirls which do add to the overall gloss of the vehicle. Having a completely smooth surface, bare paint is going to enhance the shine with a better bond.

How To Tell When A Car Needs Waxing

It’s very easy to tell if your car needs waxing. You will need to perform a simple test that will take 1 minute.

Grab a water hose and spray your hood. If the water just kinda connects together, your car does not need wax. If the water just stays there without connecting together into small drops, your car needs wax.

How To Wax Your Car For Maximum Protection

Waxing your car regularly is a must when it comes to protecting your paint finish from the elements, and with the variety of waxes available choosing the right one can be a bit confusing. Let me walk you through all the steps for waxing your car:

  1. Wash Your Car First: Start off by washing your car with soap and clean water, do not wash with chemicals. Make sure your car is dry before applying wax. The reason why you need your car to be clean and dry is that wax is not effective on a dirty or wet surface.
  2. Apply Polish: If your vehicle has that worn-out look because of scratches and faded paint, polish your car before applying wax. This step is important because the polish removes a thin layer of clear coat, and another layer shows up that has more color and is smoother. Just gently rub the polish on your vehicle’s surface with a microfiber cloth and remove it with another microfiber cloth.
  3. Find The Right Location: It’s important to choose the best location to wax your car. The preferred temperature is 55-85 degrees Fahrenheit. If its too hot, the wax li dry fast and it will be harder for you to remove it. If it’s too cold, you will have a hard time applying the wax. It’s best if you wax your vehicle indoors, the garage would be great. If you don’t have a garage, find a spot with shades or wax your car early in the morning or late at night.
  4. Choosing Wax Product: Waxes that contain carnauba wax is the best, but also the most expensive. If you don’t want to invest a lot of money in your car, you can choose a ‘cleaner’ car wax. With this wax, you will have to skip the polishing part. Avoid using spray waxes because they only last for 2 weeks.
  5. Foam Applicator: Foam applicators come free when you buy a car wax. If you don’t have, you can use a damp sponge. Take a moment to read the instructions on the wax’s label. Apply a thin layer of wax because it will be easier for you to remove it afterward.
  6. Wait: Read the instructions from the wax label to see the recommended waiting duration.
  7. Remove The Wax: Get a microfiber cloth and wipe off the wax in circular motions. Have at least 2 microfiber cloths by your side and change them as needed.

How To Remove Old Car Wax

You are probably wondering why would I want to intentionally remove the wax from the painted car surface, and the answer to that question can vary. The reason why most people remove the wax is that they are about to polish the car. I am going to show you a safe way to remove your old wax with dish soap. Is it safe? Yes, just make sure you choose a soap that is bleach free, fragrance-free, Clorox free. Just use a plain dawn dish soap, if you have in your household.

To get started, apply the dish soap to a microfiber cloth and wipe the car surface. It’s simple as that. But how would you know if you removed your old wax? Here is how to do a test:

Pour water on your wax surface. If the water beads up and runs off very quickly, it means that your surface is still waxed.

If the car doesn’t run together, just kind of sits, it means that you have successfully removed your car wax.

Best Wax Products

5. Meguilar’s Quik Wax (see on amazon.com)

  • Helps minimize water spots
  • Won’t damage or stain dark trim
  • Safe to use in sunlight

4. 5050 Jet Seal (see on amazon.com)

  • Foam and cloth applicators
  • Good for extremely deep colors
  • One of the most expensive options

3. Griot’s Garage Spray-on (see on amazon.com)

  • Applied directly to existing coats
  • Has a tropical and creamy aroma
  • Works best in slightly damp surfaces

2. Ultimate Liquid Wax (see on amazon.com)

  • Looks great when applied by hand
  • Won’t damage surrounding trim
  • A common choice of professionals

1. P21S Carnauba Wax (see on amazon.com)

  • Provides a deep-looking shine
  • Effective long-term water beading
  • Maintains showroom-quality finishes

DIY: How To Make Your Own Car Wax

If you don’t want to spend money on car wax, you can make your own wax. Also, some ingredients found in the commercial wax products are not ”people-friendly”. You don’t need a degree in chemistry to do this. I have done a research and found a way to create a perfectly safe, chemical free wax which will do the job as any other wax.

To start off, you will need:

  • 4 OZ Jar
  • Double boiler
  • 5 Tbsp Coconut Oil
  • 4 Tbsp Carnauba Wax
  • 2 Tbsp Beeswax
  • 7,5 Tbsp White Vinegar
  • 50-60 Drops of Essential Oils

Preparation:

Please follow my exact instructions. Adding some ingredient before or after will mess up the whole mixture.

  1. First, add the coconut oil and vinegar to the jar.
  2. Place the jar into a pot with simmering water.
  3. Wait until this mixture is warm.
  4. Add the carnauba wax and beeswax.
  5. Stir the mixture.
  6. Remove the jar after the mixture is melted and swirl around for 1 minute.
  7. Let it cool down.
  8. Add the essential oils and swirl again.
  9. Pour the mixture into the jar and let it set.

To use the wax you will need a clean microfiber cloth. Apply the wax on the car surface and spread it with circular motions. Let it sit for 10 minutes and then wax off with a clean microfiber cloth.

Hand Waxing VS Machine Waxing

Machine Waxing – Using a machine to wax your car will obviously save you a lot of time. You can easily break down and diminish the wax. The 10FX is my favorite because it gets in the small intricate areas. You can switch between the 3,5 and 6” backing plates without changing counterweights, so it makes it versatile on any size or shape vehicle. So, if you don’t want to waste your day to wax your car, or you are doing professional car detailing, machine waxing is best for you.

Hand Waxing – If you don’t have access to a waxing machine, you can wax your car by hand. This is the slower and harder way. It will take a long time, friction and pressure to break down and diminish the wax. You can use hand application for smaller, more intricate areas like under door handles, and small bumpers.

In the end, you will get the same result. The difference is that you will finish 10 times faster with a machine. Also, there is a good chance you will quit waxing due to tiredness if you do it by hand.

I hope this article will answer all the questions that you have about waxing your car. If not, please feel free to comment below.

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